Green, Green (Environment)

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fangz1956
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby fangz1956 » 2010 Jun 08 19:30

A built-in incentive for oil spills

Minerals Mis-management

Judges Quit Over Conflicts of Interest

Hmmmm...........the corruption goes deeper than the Deepwater Horizon rig itself and wider than a Texan oil-man's spread. Congress needs to get a serious move-on and end the liability cap for oil companies. I think perhaps more needs to be done with the Office of Minerals Management than simply splitting it into 3 bureaus and doing a bit of "ethics training". How about cleaning damn house and putting folks in that office who have no ties to the Big Boys? As long as the potential for the current relationship exists between Big Oil (and Big Coal, for that matter) and Federal "regulators" (and I use that term very loosely), then we can forever look to be left holding the bag and cleaning up the mess.......while CEO's Golden Parachute back to their lives and the OMM just parties on.

:suicide:
Ever looked at someone and thought "the wheel is turning but the hamster is dead"?

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Wise One
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Wise One » 2010 Jun 10 16:03

Some of these BP Logos are really good.

Enjoy.
"If your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like Donald Trump."

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Trend Setter
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Trend Setter » 2010 Jun 14 15:57

Do you get the feeling that BP cares only for image and not for substance?

If so, you would be correct.

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lexingtonrick
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby lexingtonrick » 2010 Jun 14 16:51

http://www.businessinsider.com/bp-has-b ... z0qrTdRDmD

"According to the Center for Public Integrity, in the last three years, BP refineries in Ohio and Texas have accounted for 97 percent of the "egregious, willful" violations handed out by OSHA"

OSHA statistics show BP ran up 760 "egregious, willful" safety violations, while Sunoco and Conoco-Phillips each had eight, Citgo had two and Exxon had one comparable citation.

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Juggler
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Juggler » 2010 Jun 21 20:17

Image

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Trend Setter
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Trend Setter » 2010 Jun 21 21:11

I think this is the best description now available of what happened with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill ― excellent and very complete.

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Wise One
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Wise One » 2010 Jul 06 20:17

As bad as Tony Hayward's performance as CEO of BP has been, his predecessor was worse, far worse.

John Browne was the George W. Bush of BP, basically wrecking it. His cynical re-branding of BP as "beyond petroleum" all a-flutter with solar energy and butterflies was the worst kind of smokescreen. His real work was dismantling all environment and safety controls, anything to squeeze more fast money just before he left with pockets bulging.

This is a devastating and completely accurate piece on the man.

Why do we keep rewarding scoundrels and criminals with the fruits of good and honest labor by poor people?

:shakeh:
"If your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like Donald Trump."

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nudgewink
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby nudgewink » 2010 Nov 23 12:26

Eric Sheffield, Nov17, 2010 in The News-Gazette. wrote: Trash Incinerator Option Raises Concerns
Editor, The News-Gazette:

I’m sure many of your readers will be surprised to learn that Rockbridge County is considering constructing a trash incinerator at the landfill to burn our garbage when the landfill closes in 2012. I know I was surprised when I first heard about it a few weeks ago. Since then I’ve tried to find out what I could, and now I’m concerned.

One of the reasons nobody has heard about the trash incinerator is that the private developers, Community Energy Independence, would prefer to call it anything but an incinerator. “Recycling for Energy,” “Plasma Gasification,” “Waste to Energy,” “Thermal-Chemical Conversion Process.” Those all sound a lot better than trash incinerator, don’t they? Unfortunately, common sense tells us that when you take trash, heat it, burn it, and 85 percent of it is spread out over our community via a smokestack, then we’re talking about an incinerator. The EPA agrees and its regulations 40CFR60.51a and 40CFR260.10 define this technology as an incinerator.

Not to worry though. According to CEI’s unsolicited proposal, which the county is currently studying, this is “recycling” and “clean energy” and “not incineration” and “nonburning conversion” and “a closed loop system” and “proven technologies” and “do(es) not form toxic compounds such as furans and dioxins …”

That would be a great relief, if any of it were true. From everything I’ve been able to find out, none of it is true. CEI admits that “This approach may be a first in the U.S …” None of CEI’s principals have any experience designing, building, or operating even a conventional incinerator. CEI has implied that there are successful examples of this experimental plasma gasification technology somewhere in Japan or Europe, but they can’t seem to say exactly where. A few months ago they were touting the Plasco plasma incinerator in Ottawa Canada. Turns out that after more than two years of attempted operation, and repeated shutdowns, the Ottawa plant was still struggling to meet emissions caps and had generated only 85 hours of electricity. Doesn’t really sound like proven technology.

As for the closed-loop, no toxic emissions claims, upon questioning, CEI has admitted that the plant will emit particulates, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, lead, hydrochloric acid, mercury, dioxins and furans. Dioxins cause cancer and are often described as one of the most toxic chemicals known to science, with no safe level of exposure. Heavy metals are especially dangerous to young children and can cause birth defects, loss of IQ, and damage to the nervous system.

Does this really sound like something we want less than a mile from Mountain View Elementary School, and less than two miles from Kling Elementary School and Buena Vista Head Start?

CEI plans to import more than five times the amount of trash we generate in Rockbridge. Makes you wonder why they don’t just put their experimental smokestack somewhere where they have enough local trash to keep it stoked. Could be that a sparsely populated, rural community with a landfill slated to close is seen as an easy mark. I don’t think they really did their homework on that count.

Of course, CEI touts jobs and energy creation. Turns out that recycling (think Auto Recyclers in Buena Vista) creates nine times as many jobs as incineration, per ton. As for energy, recycling saves four times the amount of energy that burning generates. The incinerator would be in direct competition with recycling businesses for organic recyclables.

Did I mention that CEI promises to design, permit, finance, build, and test its incinerator in time to take our trash when the landfill closes in 2012? That’s very impressive for a bunch of guys who’ve never done this before.

I won’t even go into the economics of this $50,000,000 public- private partnership, except to note that if everything goes as well as CEI promises, the county won’t save a dime compared to its other alternatives.

Am I missing something here?

:hum: Our leaders want to hide the truth of the "incinerator." Let's call it "cute fuzzy kitten" or "cuddly pink baby" or "Katie Perry." So much nicer!

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Crux
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Energy Policy...such as it is. Green isn't always good...

Postby Crux » 2011 Feb 03 19:20

New EPA rules governing carbon emissions/greenhouse gases and the first waiver issued goes to...?

...at the same time, BO's Administration ruled in contempt...

crux
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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Juggler
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Re: Green, Green

Postby Juggler » 2011 Feb 05 11:09

Image

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Crux
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SHHHH....

Postby Crux » 2011 Feb 06 09:28

....I have nothing to say...

Except Giggler, that is a cute cartoon. Clever. So what do you think about Obama's Contempt of Court, shutting down our domestic off shore oil drilling, and BO's WAIVER to General Electric so they avoid the new EPA carbon emissions regulations (...name Jeffrey Immelt ring a bell?)?

crux
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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Wise One
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Wise One » 2011 Jul 19 10:27

NYT July 18, 2011 wrote:The Peak and Life Below It

A familiar metaphor for nature is the pyramid of life, with large predators living at the peak because they’re few in number and eat species lower on the pyramid. Like most simple metaphors, this one has a perceptual flaw. It creates the illusion that large predators have an effect only on the prey species immediately below them. The truth, as a growing body of scientific studies shows, is that the presence, and absence, of top predators cascades all through nature in surprisingly complex ways.

Our species has done a sadly efficient job of removing top predators: wolves, bears, lions, tigers, sharks and many more. According to the authors of a new article in Science magazine, “the loss of these animals may be humankind’s most pervasive influence on nature.”

The loss of cougars in what is now Zion National Park led to an “eruption” of mule deer, which reduced riverbank vegetation and, ultimately, changed the shape of stream channels. The loss of sea otters along the Pacific Coast led to the destruction of kelp forests and the many creatures they supported. The effect includes herbivores. When disease decimated wildebeest in East Africa in the late 19th century, grassland turned to shrubs and into fuel for wildfires, changing the ecosystem.

In the rare cases where top predators have been reintroduced, the benefit is profound. The success of gray wolves in Yellowstone changed many things. Grizzlies fed on their kills. Coyote numbers dropped and the numbers of small mammals climbed. Elk spent less time in creek bottoms, where they were more vulnerable, and streamside ecology changed as a result.

It is now clear that biological diversity increases when top predators are present. The pyramid is healthiest when its peak is still present and when humans aren’t the only top predators around.
"If your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like Donald Trump."

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Coondog
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Coondog » 2011 Jul 19 11:32

Wow, Wise One

You have just made the most persuasive argument for the conservative viewpoint I believe I've seen yet.

Peak Predators! So.....that's why we need to protect the upper 2%!

Coondog :clap:

By destroying civilization, utterly, we can restore the sort of balance once enjoyed during the Stone Age. Or......were you talking about ecology? I don't think conservatives believe it exists. There's a paradox here, somewhere!

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Sam
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Sam » 2011 Jul 19 12:21

Enjoyed the posting and especially as it is not political. Get tired of that stuff after awhile. Having lived out West, got to say that when Yellowstone depleted the wolf population the elk about destroyed some very important vegetation. They had to re-introduce the wolves back into Yellowstone. It seems to me it's difficult in keeping a good balance between the wolf population and the ranchers who lose cattle to the wolves in the West. I have a brother who owns a small ranch in the West and he struggles with the wolf issue.

And Coondog, you seem to me to be one bitter fellow. Hey Pal, why bring in the conservative slant on this subject. While I am a conservative, you got us or at least some of us all wrong. I would tell you as I have heard my grandchildren say, Get a life.
Only in America could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as
"extremists

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Wise One
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Wise One » 2011 Jul 19 13:13

Sam, we share experiences in the American West. I too have seen first hand the long term damage that is caused by short term "improvements" to Nature, like suppressing forest fires and extirpating wolves.

This is an excellent piece about the influence of the wolf and fire on forest ecology.

There was a 50 year gap in recruitment of new aspen trees in Glacier National Park because of the Park Service's fire control program and because the wolf had been driven extinct. With the top predator gone, elk no longer feared to browse deep into aspen groves, eating all young trees as they sprouted rather than just nibbling fearfully at grove edges. Fire is also a necessary condition for the next generation of aspen tree. Glacier Park was well on its way to a sick monoculture of lodgepole pine until fire and wolf were reintroduced, restoring a healthy balance between aspen and pine and fostering a diversity of other species.

:coffee:

Ironically, I was employed in my college years by the fire control program. I took young and foolish pride in working with Smoky Bear for "good," of course coming to realize years later that we were all doing exactly the wrong thing. Later, the fire control program was essentially dismantled in the national parks, good riddance. However, inappropriately aggressive fire control practices persist even today in many forested areas.
"If your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like Donald Trump."

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Coondog
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Coondog » 2011 Jul 19 14:18

You may be right, Sam!

I was attempting to to bring a bit of levity to all the bitterness that builds up with every newscast. I have no desire to suffer the fate of Yellowstone Wolves.

Get a sense of humor! It's the only thing that keeps me from foaming at the mouth and biting ankles with reckless abandon.

Coondog :joker:

Everything is political these days.

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Wise One
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Wise One » 2011 Jul 19 15:41

coondog wrote:... foaming at the mouth and biting ankles with reckless abandon.

Spoken like a true "top predator."

I fear you.

Greatly.

:surrend:
"If your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like Donald Trump."

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Crux
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On ankle biters...

Postby Crux » 2011 Jul 20 12:33

I kick ankle biters. I fear no little yappy dogs. Try to actually bite my ankle and I'll set a dog on it's tail... :nono:
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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Crux
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Villains come in all colors....

Postby Crux » 2011 Jul 20 12:42

...even GREEN.


But who's counting bats anyway. :geek:
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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Sam
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Re: Environmental Villains?

Postby Sam » 2011 Jul 21 07:15

Wise One wrote:Sam, we share experiences in the American West. I too have seen first hand the long term damage that is caused by short term "improvements" to Nature, like suppressing forest fires and extirpating wolves.

I have found in my younger days that the desire to put out fires was very strong. But having lived in Montana and seeing the fires at Yellowstone made me think. I was told that they let the fires burn and in fact saw large parts of the park burned....but they say that is helpful. I went with my grandparents to several "gathering of tepees" while growing up and always learned so much from these meets. I love the West but cannot live there now....not sure why. But the cold sure does get to my old bones.
coondog wrote:Everything is political these days.

Hey Pal, from my perspective, everything is not political unless one makes it so.
Only in America could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as
"extremists