Unchecked Power

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Crux
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Hmm...

Postby Crux » 2011 May 02 17:41

Trump is about Trump. Just like Obama is all about "I Me My I've"... Real fun to watch 'corndog lament the Donald when we SUFFER with OBUMMER...
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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Sam
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Sam » 2011 May 02 19:13

I understand that because of intelligence obtained at Gitmo, the government has been tracking OBL following a runner. The information came from the CiA from information obtained at Gitmo in 2003. So it was Bin Laden's dependence on runners instead of cell phones that led the government to him. Thank heavens for that information gotten at Gitmo, which eventually led to the capture and death of old OBL.

Yeah I can't stant Trump and wish he would fade into the woodwork. I am a Independent, and a conservative, and don't see Trump addressing my needs. In fact don't see anyone doing that. I can tell you for sure my friend, Obama doesn't address my needs either.
Only in America could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as
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Buck Turgidson
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Buck Turgidson » 2011 May 03 07:54

Sam wrote: ... From the New York Post By MICHAEL D. TANNER ...
And I might add I have found that my wife and I are already experiencing long waits to get an appointment with our dr.

Thank you, Sam. I sometimes have long waits too. Thankfully it has only been for routine matters like periodic exams, all time-sensitive needs being handled promptly. My guys are stetting their priorities OK so far.

The article doesn't seem to be evidence of a shortage so much as a conservative writer's fear about the future. Tanner works for CATO, a libertarian think tank. Everything he writes attacks government.

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Sam
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Sam » 2011 May 03 08:36

From the Association of American Medical Colleges

Addressing the Physician Shortage Under Reform
—By Sarah Mann
Given the likelihood that more people will enter the health care system in coming years following passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it is equally likely that more doctors will be needed to treat them.
Recognizing the growing gulf between physician supply and patient demand, medical education leaders and the AAMC are working to inform Congress and other lawmakers about the best means of addressing physician shortages. One of these potential means is lifting the existing cap on Medicare-funded residency positions.
“After the passage of ACA, there is recognition that there will be real physician shortages if we don’t do more to lift the residency cap,” said AAMC Chief Advocacy Officer Atul Grover, M.D., Ph.D. “People on both sides of the aisle have realized the need to train more doctors.”

A physician shortage was already expected before ACA was signed into law in March 2010, and now that gap could worsen. According to projections released last fall by the AAMC Center for Workforce Studies, there will be a shortage of about 63,000 doctors by 2015, with greater shortages on the horizon—91,500 and 130,600 for 2020 and 2025, respectively. Earlier projections had placed the shortage at about 39,600 doctors by 2015. Since 2008, AAMC projections have incorporated later utilization data and changing specialization patterns among new physicians, and have shown shortages across those specialties as well as in primary care.

The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 froze the number of Medicare-supported positions in hospitals at 1996 levels. Since then, the number of Medicare-funded residency slots has remained relatively stable at about 100,000 per year, despite a growing demand for medical services and increasing projections of physician shortages.

Several factors are contributing to the growing demand. On top of the 32 million Americans who will get insurance cards if the ACA is fully implemented, 15 million more will become eligible for Medicare in the coming years. Meanwhile, physician supply is projected to drop because of baby boomer retirement and other factors.

“The new AAMC projections reflect what happens with a relatively sudden increase in physician demand,” said Scott Shipman, M.D., M.P.H., senior researcher of workforce studies at AAMC. “From a projection standpoint, there is an exacerbated shortage in all areas.”

To mitigate the coming shortages, in 2006, the AAMC called for a 30 percent increase in medical school enrollment by 2015. To date, enrollment has risen 13 percent. But without a concomitant increase in GME slots, increasing the overall physician supply in the U.S. will be impossible.

Several specialties in particular could experience shortages of 62,400 doctors by 2020, according to 2008 data from the federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). General surgery is predicted to be one of the hardest-hit specialties, with a shortage of 21,400 surgeons.

Ophthalmology and orthopedic surgery are each expected to need more than 6,000 physicians over current levels. Urology, psychiatry, and radiology all are expected to see shortfalls of more than 4,000 physicians, according to the HRSA figures.

In addition, a recent study from the American Academy of Dermatology found that there are only 3.5 dermatologists for every 100,000 Americans, with patient wait times running as long as three months in some areas.

The ACA did take steps to address the shortage. For example, the reform law will redistribute some unused residency slots and increase funding for the National Health Service Corps, which sends resident physicians and others to practice in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs). HRSA statistics show that as of September 2009, about 65 million people were living in primary care HPSAs.
“With the shortage of physicians, it is usually the most vulnerable patients who have access problems,” said Tim Dall, a health economist and director of health care consulting at IHS Global Insight. “It’s often the Medicaid population because Medicaid reimbursement rates are so low.”

According to Grover, several legislative options could help alleviate the shortage. Making care more efficient by training residents in quality improvement, patient safety, and team-based treatment is one potential avenue, as is redirecting unused residency slots into new and existing programs while changing existing rules to allow residents to train in non-hospital settings.
Still, analysts maintain there is no real substitute for raising the residency cap. Grover said the AAMC is hoping to work with members of Congress and others to expand residency slots by 15 percent, or an additional 4,000 slots per year, which would be phased in to mirror a projected 30 percent increase in medical school enrollment.

Although lawmakers seem more aware of the impending physician shortage, a sluggish economy and the new focus on reduced federal spending will present a challenge to keeping residency cap issues on the congressional radar.

“In an era with no money, the prospects are pretty grim,” Grover said, noting that if cost were not an issue, proposals to lift the residency cap would most likely have “very good” chances.
Although the prospects are bleak from a financial standpoint, Grover added that it is important to introduce the bill to keep politicians informed.
“Prospects may be grim on a financial front, but it is important to make sure patients have access, so we want to keep this on the radar.”


The way I make it as more people retire the physician shortage will get even worse. Because I was recently sick, I tried to see our family dr. and could not get in right away as I used to say about a couple of years ago. Even though I have some real medical issues. I have to say the fellow says he based his article from information gleaned from the above site I am referencing. Whether he is right or left it seems to me the article does hold some truth.

Maybe they government will put us older folks out on ice blocks to float out to sea
Only in America could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as
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Buck Turgidson
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Buck Turgidson » 2011 May 03 09:17

Aha, now it begins to make sense. Thanks for sending along the article.

It is not a shortage yet, but one that might develop. The whole point of the medical care law is to expand the quantity and quality of medical care delivered. So, yes, of course there will be more demand for medical services. Duh. That is the whole point.

There has been a chronic oversupply of doctors in relation to demand nationwide up to now, which is the reason for setting residency caps to limit the number of doctors produced. If the law works, then there will be an increase in demand (better health care and more employment) so of course the cap numbers will have to be looked at again in light of changed realities.

I look forward to that better future.

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Sam
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Sam » 2011 May 03 09:22

When you say medical care law what exactly are you referring to? The new health care bill often referred to as obama care? Just curious
Only in America could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as
"extremists

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Coondog
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Coondog » 2011 May 04 16:20

Trump is about Trump. Just like Obama is all about "I Me My I've"...

Cruxbaugh! If you're gonna quote Rush, give him some credit. That's what its all about, isin't it? Credit!

I like Stephen Colbert's analogy - the coach pulling his team off the field in the first quarter and sending them next door to play basketball for 8 years - then a new coach takes over and sends the team back out onto the field to shoot the opposing quarterback in the eye.

Coondog :thumbup:

Boom, Baby!
-Jeff Overton

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Crux
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Full of you-know-what...

Postby Crux » 2011 May 04 18:21

...'corn.

I am sure that Rush and others have commented on BO's narcissism, or compared Trump to BO. I put it my way, in context, with no tip of any hat to RUSH big'un. :thumbup:

On Colbert, you would like his ridiculous analogy. As has been amply noted, but not by YOU or Colbert, BO has in HUGE and SIGNIFICANT ways, hypocritically LAMBASTED BUSH POLICY AND ACTION, and then turned around and used BUSH'S POLICY AND ACTIONS... :geek:

1. Gitmo
2. The Patriot Act
3. War in Iraq
4. War in Afghanistan
5. Enhanced interrogation techniques including WATER BOARDING KSM who coughed up OBL's courier, which after YEARS of intelligence gathering (BUSH POLICIES) led BO to his political opportunity, taking out OBL.

This could be flushed out with specifics and footnotes and much TIME, but the point is Colbert and YOU 'corn, are ridiculous in your "liking" of said analogy. :pat: It demonstrates MUCH, if ever so little real understanding... :nono:

cruxtastic
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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Sam
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Sam » 2011 May 04 22:37

hey brother, couldn't agree with you more. What amazes me is that no democrate is complaining about Gitmo now or the enhanced interrogation which elicited the information on the runner or whatever he is called that led to the find of the compound where they found OBL.
Only in America could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as
"extremists

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Amy Probenski
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Amy Probenski » 2011 May 05 08:56

I could not disagree more with your brutal and dysfunctional view of power. It was foresworn utterly by an admired America until the immoral stench of the Bush administration cast us into the den of scum holding the worst dictatorships of history. This editorial says it well.
NYT Editorial on May 4, 2011 wrote: The Torture Apologists

The killing of Osama bin Laden provoked a host of reactions from Americans: celebration, triumph, relief, closure and renewed grief. One reaction, however, was both cynical and disturbing: crowing by the apologists and practitioners of torture that Bin Laden’s death vindicated their immoral and illegal behavior after the Sept. 11 attacks.

Jose Rodriguez Jr. was the leader of counterterrorism for the C.I.A. from 2002-2005 when Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and other Al Qaeda leaders were captured. He told Time magazine that the recent events show that President Obama should not have banned so-called enhanced interrogation techniques. (Mr. Rodriguez, you may remember, ordered the destruction of interrogation videos.)

John Yoo, the former Bush Justice Department lawyer who twisted the Constitution and the Geneva Conventions into an unrecognizable mess to excuse torture, wrote in The Wall Street Journal that the killing of Bin Laden proved that waterboarding and other abuses were proper. Donald Rumsfeld, the former defense secretary, said at first that no coerced evidence played a role in tracking down Bin Laden, but by Tuesday he was reciting the talking points about the virtues of prisoner abuse.

There is no final answer to whether any of the prisoners tortured in President George W. Bush’s illegal camps gave up information that eventually proved useful in finding Bin Laden. A detailed account in The Times on Wednesday by Scott Shane and Charlie Savage concluded that torture “played a small role at most” in the years and years of painstaking intelligence and detective work that led a Navy Seals team to Bin Laden’s hideout in Pakistan.

That squares with the frequent testimony over the past decade from many other interrogators and officials. They have said repeatedly, and said again this week, that the best information came from prisoners who were not tortured. The Times article said Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, who was waterboarded 183 times, fed false information to his captors during torture.

Even if it were true that some tidbit was blurted out by a prisoner while being tormented by C.I.A. interrogators, that does not remotely justify Mr. Bush’s decision to violate the law and any acceptable moral standard.

This was not the “ticking time bomb” scenario that Bush-era officials often invoked to rationalize abusive interrogations. If, as Representative Peter King, the Long Island Republican, said, information from abused prisoners “directly led” to the redoubt, why didn’t the Bush administration follow that trail years ago?

There are many arguments against torture. It is immoral and illegal and counterproductive. The Bush administration’s abuses — and ends justify the means arguments — did huge damage to this country’s standing and gave its enemies succor and comfort. If that isn’t enough, there is also the pragmatic argument that most experienced interrogators think that the same information, or better, can be obtained through legal and humane means.

No matter what Mr. Yoo and friends may claim, the real lesson of the Bin Laden operation is that it demonstrated what can be done with focused intelligence work and persistence.

The battered intelligence community should now be basking in the glory of a successful operation. It should not be dragged back into the muck and murk by political figures whose sole agenda seems to be to rationalize actions that cost this country dearly — in our inability to hold credible trials for very bad men and in the continued damage to our reputation.

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Buck Turgidson
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Buck Turgidson » 2011 May 05 09:32

Boy, do I ever agree with you on that!
Worse, the Bush crowd may not be a one-time deal. The really frightening thing is how poorly educated Americans are these days about the basics of American law and tradition. If so many citizens don't have a clue what the Bill of Rights is or why it is important, how can we expect them to defend its principles?
You hear strident attacks on the ACLU, an organization whose sole purpose is to uphold the most American of our foundation principles, our Bill of Rights. I can hardly imagine a more un-American attack.
Sam Dillon wrote:Failing Grades on Civics Exam Called a ‘Crisis’

Fewer than half of American eighth graders knew the purpose of the Bill of Rights on the most recent national civics examination, and only one in 10 demonstrated acceptable knowledge of the checks and balances among the legislative, executive and judicial branches, according to test results released on Wednesday.

At the same time, three-quarters of high school seniors who took the test, the National Assessment of Educational Progress, were unable to demonstrate skills like identifying the effect of United States foreign policy on other nations or naming a power granted to Congress by the Constitution.

“Today’s NAEP results confirm that we have a crisis on our hands when it comes to civics education,” said Sandra Day O’Connor, the former Supreme Court justice, who last year founded icivics.org, a nonprofit group that teaches students civics through Web-based games and other tools. ...

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fangz1956
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby fangz1956 » 2011 May 05 14:02

The politicians who are embracing the fallacy that "torture" led directly to the death of Osama do not deserve to be re-elected or even listened to on this subject. I did not cheer this event and am saddened by the number of citizens who did cheer and celebrate. And the wars drag on.........

It is no wonder that American students today know nothing of the Bill of Rights, how the government works, and are completely clueless when it comes to American Foreign Policy. We can thank the Standards of Learning, No Child Left Behind and the current pressure to 'teach to the test". My youngest finished high school last year and I am appalled at how little she was actually taught on these subjects. She and her friends have no interest in current events...and that is really no surprise given what little of real importance they were taught along the way. Here's hoping that there is still a chance that the light will come on and she will begin embrace an understanding and interest in how the world works.

Still Stupid, Still Wrong, Still Immoral

:sad:
Ever looked at someone and thought "the wheel is turning but the hamster is dead"?

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Crux
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Bin Laden Deserved to Die by Our Hands.

Postby Crux » 2011 May 05 17:56

That's the way I see it. Now as for the rest, I get sick watching BO take his "victory lap", when it wasn't so long ago He was seeking to prosecute (potentially) NAVY SEALS, for punching a terrorist in the lip!! The SEAL was not prosecuted...

As for the state of our public schools, welcome to MODERN LIBERALISM and TEACHERS UNIONS. There is no real discipline compared to 25 years ago. There isn't even AFTER SCHOOL DETENTION at our own RCHS. Griping about GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS by DEMOCRATS is a real hoot.
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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fangz1956
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby fangz1956 » 2011 May 05 21:44

crux wrote:
Griping about GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS by DEMOCRATS is a real hoot.

Put a sock in it. I never claimed to be a Democrat ......or a member of any other political party. Most people I know, regardless of political persuasion, feel exactly the same about the current state of things in the schools.

Geez...with all of your superior intelligence on every subject, I am surprised that the Rockbridge County schools aren't superior to all others thanks to you. Oh, but that will never happen because you have zero interest in what happens in your community because you are too damn busy fixing the the rest of the world. If you had any interest at all in your community you would be knowledgeable about SOL's and No Child Left Behind....but you won't look reality square in the eye because those are Republican inventions, not Democratic ones.

:bath:
Ever looked at someone and thought "the wheel is turning but the hamster is dead"?

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Amy Probenski
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Amy Probenski » 2011 May 05 22:21

fangz1956 wrote:Put a sock in it.

A reasonable, and utterly useless, request.
I found and use the only sock that works in his case, the "foe filter" !

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Coondog
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Coondog » 2011 May 06 14:13

What's missing in public schools is critical thinking. It's not allowed. That's why there are actually young Republicans!

Coondog :hum:

If we value the pursuit of knowledge, we must be free to follow wherever that search may lead us. The free mind is not a barking dog, to be tethered on a ten-foot chain.
Adlai E. Stevenson Jr

ParkerLongbaugh

Re: Unchecked Power

Postby ParkerLongbaugh » 2011 May 06 15:32

coondog wrote:What's missing in public schools is critical thinking. It's not allowed. That's why there are actually young Republicans!

Coondog

And that's why this forum is so frustrating, and sometimes of little value to many of its participants. The first half of the post is worth discussing with others and of interest many, I would think. The last part just shows any such discussion to likely be of little merit and pretty much guaranteed to devolve into silliness and name-calling. He-Who-Is-Now-Foe'd-By-Many is certainly not the only one here who can ruin interesting lines of thought with that crap.

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Crux
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OK Parker et al...

Postby Crux » 2011 May 06 15:39

I am game. What part merits discussion. I am fullly able to discuss.
crux identifies with American Principles. Personal Liberty, Respect and Limited government.
He is a classic liberal, a libertarian at heart, and a conservative in the classical sense...

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Coondog
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Coondog » 2011 May 06 16:04

Lighten Up, PLB!

A bit of humorous jabbing is a good thing. But if you think about it critically, it does address the current state of affairs vis a vis education. SOL has at least two meanings, both applicable to the current curriculum. What has been lost is the ability of square pegs to discover a corresponding hole. The ensuing whittling of their sharp edges in order to forcibly direct them into standardized round holes is detrimental to the individual as well as the system as a whole.

Crux speaks of discipline and lack of adequate punitive measures. High school is, as it has always been, a system where students are treated like children and punished like adults. Anyone who can flourish and develop any measure of self esteem in this atmosphere which crushes individuality and expression is an anomaly.

As I said, the repression of critical thinking produces easily manipulated automatons who unquestionably follow, en mass, any authority within any social structure they identify with. The round pegs will slip frictionlessly through a well worn hole of conformity and bovine acceptance of whatever information found within the text books printed in Texas by similarly rounded, narrowly focused pegs. The square pegs will likely end up in the criminal justice system....along with all manner of independent cognitive processes and the dreaded intellectualism that so terrifies and repulses pegs of a circular nature.

Look no further than evangelical Christians and the US house of representatives for examples of exactly what I'm talking about. Weighty and dire concepts! Who can address such matters without a healthy measure of satirical finger jabbing?

Coondog :joker:

“My method is to take the utmost trouble to find the right thing to say, and then to say it with the utmost levity”
George Bernard Shaw

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Sam
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Re: Unchecked Power

Postby Sam » 2011 May 07 05:48

coondog wrote:Lighten Up, PLB!A bit of humorous jabbing is a good thing.

I agree with Parker....a bit of humorous jabbing my eye. There have been times with some folks get downright miserable here. When I used some statement made by several folks here but changed the name Republican to Democrat or conservative to liberal....a number got downright angry to the point of calling me names. Yeah so as I keep pointing out there is a double standard here. It is considered humorous jabbing when they say it but not so when I or Crux say
Only in America could the people who believe in balancing the budget and sticking by the country's Constitution be thought of as
"extremists